Posts Tagged ‘1960s’

Kevin asks…

Does anyone remember Albert Trapp? He used to be a binman many years ago (1960/70s) working from Lifford Lane.

He talks about his days working with great people all the time.

Ian Fergus writes…

I found this site very recently and reading it has brought back so many memories. There are so many names I recall from the time I lived in the area!

I grew up in Midland Road, where we lived from 1963 until 1971. I went to Cotteridge school and then to Kings Norton Grammar.

My Dad Archie set up a football team based in the park, that went on to become quite a successful set up, Cotteridge Park Rangers.

It started as a way of occupying youngsters and initially lads of my age ended up with a local football team. This included names like: David Harris, the Cotton twins, Ray Priest, Alan Waterhouse to name but a few.

It then grew and an adult team was formed, no longer based in the park but retaining the name.

They played in the Kings Norton League and won several titles during the late 60s early 70s.

We moved away in 1971 to live in the west country. I have visited the area on several occasions and had a trip down memory lane. I also have a number of photos stored that I intend to scan and get to the site, most of these relate to the football but I would be fascinated to hear if there are still people around who recall those days.

Update: Spent a long time thinking about these pics and huge apologies to those I have failed to recall but as best I can remember the names are shown below. I would be fascinated to see if anyone could fill in the gaps and would love to hear from anyone that either played or could remember those days.

 

Photo 1: (standing L to R) Rob Price, David Harris, Ian Fergus, Paul Toombs (holding ball), unknown, Roger Owen, Archie Fergus (Manager), unknown.
(kneeling L to R): Ian MacLelan (I think), Ray Priest, Keith Hilston, John Petrucciano, Neil Derrington, Vincent Hickey,
(seated L to R) unknown

 

Photo 2: (Back L to R): one of the Cotton twins, Roger Owen, unknown, Mick Corke, David Garner.
(Front L to R): unknown, Ian Fergus, David Harris, unknown, Alan Waterfield

 

Photo 3 (Standing L to R): unknown, Rob Garner, unknown, unknown, unknown, Rob Price.
(Kneeling L to R): Ray Priest, unknown, unknown, Paul Toombs, unknown, Neil Derrington.

 

 

Julia writes…

I am one of many grandchildren of Frank Lawton, who started a business in 1906 of cooked meats and pork pies etc.

This shop was 1833 Pershore Road, Cotteridge.

In 1956 they celebrated its jubilee. The business continued into the early 60s.

I am very anxious to know if anyone has pictures of the shop, as I am in the process of writing about this.

You may even remember the van driven by Harold – pale green with a cream egg shape sign on the sides of the van with writing about Lawton cooked meats.

Bev writes…

I am looking for any information, photos etc of my husbands family.

His father was Stanley Newton who was married to Peggy Newton, nee Richards, until her death in 1967.

He then married a lady called Frances.

I have two sons and we have no photos or information about their father’s family. We are just looking for any information or photos or any details of Peggy’s family. We are not necessarily in need of any contact if it is not wanted. Just some photos of their fathers family would be great. Their father could never tell them much and now this is their only hope.

I hope you can help, thanks!

Photo by DJ Norton
 
 
Thanks to DJ Norton for these photos
There’s a fantastic website of more photos like these here
Looking north towards the city from the Pershore Road / Watford Road roundabout. On the corner of Watford Road is George Mason's shop. St Agnes Church is still present - it's now a supermarket. The newly-build Lloyds Bank building is present in the row of Victorian shops on the right.

1962. Looking north towards the city from the Pershore Road / Watford Road roundabout. On the corner of Watford Road is George Mason's shop. St Agnes Church is still present - it's now a supermarket. The newly-build Lloyds Bank building is present in the row of Victorian shops on the right.

September 1962: the construction of Pearks Supermarket on Watford Road (now a Spar). Next to Woolworths is Boots and George Bridge.

September 1962: the construction of Pearks Supermarket on Watford Road (now a Spar). Next to Woolworths is Boots and George Bridge.

September 1962: a different shot of the supermarket under construction, also showing the post office.

September 1962: a different shot of the supermarket under construction, also showing the post office.

The central building is the Fire Station. To its left, the shop features a neon sign saying, "Electricity Supply". To the left of that is a shop called, "Under the Clock" - for obvious reasons! Finally, on the far left is Malcolm's 'Hair Fashion Artists'. On the far right, the top of the spire of Kings Norton church can just about be seen.

The central building is the Fire Station. To its left, the shop features a neon sign saying, "Electricity Supply". To the left of that is a shop called, "Under the Clock" - for obvious reasons! Finally, on the far left is Malcolm's 'Hair Fashion Artists'. On the far right, the top of the spire of Kings Norton church can just about be seen.

For the same views today, click here

 Photo by DJ Norton
Thanks to DJ Norton for these photos
There’s a fantastic website of more photos like these here  

Three shots that clearly show the importance of Kings Norton station in the 1950s.

The uppermost not only shows the four platform station but also shows a section of goods yard and shed.  To the right, the carriage sidings can be seen.  In the middle picture, the photo shows the northern half of the station from under the footbridge.

The bottom picture is taken looking in the opposite direction to the other two – out of city and towards Northfield.  The signal box from which the top picture was taken can just about be seen under the footbridge.

Kings Norton Station, 1950s

 Kings Norton Station

 

Kings Norton Station

 

May 1962: a two-car DMU stands in the up fast platform on its way from Redditch to New Street. In strict economic turns a lightweight two-car self-propelled train is much cheaper than the ex-MR 0-6-2T 'Flatiron' tank locomotives with two to four coaches behind the bunker or even later when Ivatt's and Riddles 2-6-2T tank engines took over.

May 1962: a two-car DMU stands in the up fast platform on its way from Redditch to New Street. In strict economic turns a lightweight two-car self-propelled train is much cheaper than the ex-MR 0-6-2T 'Flatiron' tank locomotives with two to four coaches behind the bunker or even later when Ivatt's and Riddles 2-6-2T tank engines took over.

1960: looking across the island platform from the up slow to the down slow where the main station building was sited.

1960: looking across the island platform from the up slow to the down slow where the main station building was sited.

I used to live at 1774 Pershore Road behind and above a second hand shop therefore consequently my nickname at school was Steptoe.

The family ran this business from just after the second world war until the late 1990s. In fact one of my dad’s childhood memories was playing cricket across the Pershore Road, imagine that now!

My granddad Frank, started the shop, F E Waldron, and ran it until he died in 1965.

My grandmother Elsie Waldron, (known as Margaret at St Agnes church because she didn’t like her name and so her church friends gave her a name that she liked), was  a dress maker and later lived in Midland Road where she created wedding outfits and dresses for many until she died in the 1980s.

My dad, Reg Waldron, took over the business from until the late 1990s however was tragically murdered in the shop by a guy that needed money for Christmas. It was a pretty unpleasant affair and the guy was arrested by a retired police officer cleaning his soiled clothes in Kings Norton Green laundrette.  So I suppose this is part of a darker side of Cotteridge as this is one of a few incidents in the area.

I like Cotteridge, it has many memories both happy and sad and therefore I still feel apart of the area though have not lived there for many years.

FE Waldron

FE Waldron, around 1945-50

I attended Cotteridge School from 1962 to 1969. My older brother Colin was in the year above me and my younger brother Keith three years below. We lived at 1 Lifford Cottages in Lifford Lane where our playground was the cut (at the front of the cottages) and the railway (behind us).

Among the teachers I remember were Miss Self, Miss Hudson, Mrs Brooking, Miss Smith, Mrs Meggs, Mrs Rudkin, Miss Wells and Mr Waugh. Our head was Mr Pebworth, but I also remember Mr Hewlett who I think kept pigs. Miss Smith fascinated me as I thought she was at least 100 at the time, andI think I was one of the few children who liked her and enjoyed her class.

Children I remember are Philip Haynes and his brother Tony who lived down the lane from us, Jackie Barker whose family lived at Lifford Hall for a while, Julie Richards who lived at the Breedon Pub for a while, Susan Cope and Wendy Mason whose mom was our crossing warden in the late 60s. We used to get our daily sweet ration from the sweet shop at the top of Francis Road or the shop next to Austin Clissetts just up past the old police station.

Our mother also went to Cotteridge from 1928 to 1937. My mother remembers a teacher named Mr Merryweather and tells me that the girls used to go to a house in Cotteridge to do housework as part of their lessons. Older girls stayed at Cotteridge but the boys went to Stirchley school. After school she worked at the paper mill by the canal, her grandparents, Major and Annie Flavell, owned the chip shop next to the Breedon pub.

We moved to Stirchley in the mid 60s but stayed at Cotteridge School and today the pull is still strong as 17 years ago I moved back up the Hill and now live just round the corner from Lifford Lane where I can see the roof of the house I was born in from my bedroom window.

Julie Bailey (nee Pedley)
October 2007

Tony wonders is anyone can remember an off licence in Beaumont Rd in the 1960s. He’s lived in Bournville for over 45 years and seems to remember residents taking a carrier bag to the off licence to disguise the fact that they were fetching drinks, but he’d appreciate any confirmation that this was true. 

Leave a comment below or email us if you know any more.

 

The Life Boys which met at St. Agnes' Church in the 1950/60s.

The Life Boys, early sixties

Thanks to Mary Thorpe for these, who writes: “the top one features just Reverend Fred Carroll and Miss Jennifer Fryer and the second is about a year later.  Names of the boys (on the first) I can remember are: next to Revd. Carroll is someone Edge, next to Miss Fryer is Paul Cooper, then back row second from the left is Robert Bassett, Stuart Maddocks, Leslie Ormrod, John Betteridge, David Harris, Martin Holeyman, [don’t know], someone Gilman, (don’t know).  Hope someone can  fill in the rest of the names!” 

Click the photos for a larger version.

The Life Boys, St Agnes Church, early 1960s

The Life Boys, early sixties

Also thanks to Mary for this photo of the Girls’ Life Brigade at St. Agnes Church, sometime in the early 1960s. She writes, “again, I can’t remember names, but those I do remember are from top left, Mary Harris (me!), two sisters, unknown, unknown, Janet Fisher, Jacqueline someone, unknown, then on the front row, unknown, Delia Harris (no relation), Joan Badger, Reverend Fred Carroll, unknown, Anne Fisher. I do hope someone is able to furnish the other names. I continued in the GLB, eventually going to the Company at the Methodist Church until I started helping Joan Badger with the Brownies back at St. Agnes’s in the 1970s”.

Life Girls at St Agnes, early 1960s

Life Girls at St Agnes, early 1960s

Email us or leave a comment below if you know who anyone is or have any memories to add.

Cotteridge Primary School football team, 1959-60

Cotteridge Primary School football team, 1959-60

Thanks to Neil Brown (goalkeeper) for this: contact us if you want to get in touch with him.

Also featured are Nicky Twigg, Cliff Owen, Ian Cresswell, Archie Milward and Mr Hewlett.

Update: Marty Holeyman has e-mailed to say that he is the Harry Potter lookalike on the right hand side. If anyone wants to get in touch with him, contact us or leave a comment below and we’ll forward it on.

Update 2: Ian Caswell writes: “Absolutely amazed and pleased to see the photo. I am the ‘footballer’ front row extreme right. Slight mis-spelling but the name should read Ian Caswell. Archie Millward is actually the one on the other side of Neil Brown behind the teacher. Archie and I are still in regular contact after 55 years! Front row far left is Richard James.”

I was at Cotteridge School from 1958 – 1964 and would like to give my memories, especially regarding Miss Smith. As several have mentioned, in hindsight we realise she was a teacher who cared about children learning and yes, Maths was her subject. I did benefit from being in her class and wish that I had paid more attention. Miss Smith had always taught the ‘remedial’ class, but the year I came under her care she had obviously asked to be allowed to take a ‘normal’ class. My mother told me in later years that most parents were horrified to find on the bottom of the reports under “class next year” the name of Miss Smith as they had not been told of the change in circumstances!

I too remember the tappings on the head and ruler on the hand, but also remember the Geography lessons because she had a lot of penfriends and visited them. I also remember visiting her house – with about 3-4 others – and having a Japanese afternoon on a Saturday. We were able to examine Japanese items and had a Japanese meal. I think this was a reward for something – perhaps good work!

It is perhaps only 4 or 5 years ago that I saw Miss Smith in Kwik Save while visiting my father, but was unable to get through the queues to speak to her. I enjoyed my time at Cotteridge School and would love to hear from anyone who remembers me.

Mrs Mary Thorpe (nee Harris)

I was at Cotteridge School from 1962 – 67 and remember it just as if it was yesterday. Sounds corny doesn’t it, and that’s what our parents used to say, thinking about something from the past. But it´s absolutely true. I remember the children who shared more or less the same experiences, from the first day in Miss Self`s class, to leaving the school after the 11 plus and Mr Pebworth as the headmaster.

Some of the children I remember:

  • Jeffrey Watson (went to his birthday party, he lived on the Pershore Road, just down from the school)
  • Teresa Hastings and Heather Wilson (I think some of the boys were a bit scared of them, they could pack a punch)
  • Anita Clamp (my first love, emigrated to Canada andI never saw her again, her father was a policeman I think)
  • Anita Harris (always smiling)
  • Hetty Sturge (a quiet little black girl, with a religious family)
  • Colin Pedley (my best friend but we lost contact after we came in different classes at our next school)
  • Robert Waldron (his father owned a shop just over the road on the corner of Francis Road, it had all sorts of things in there, both new and old)
  • Then there were the Cotton twins, Robert Wagstaff, John Baldwin, “Nobby” Clark (of course) Later when I became a soldier i served in the same Regiment as his cousin and we could share some memories.

I really missed Cotteridge, both the ups and downs, I remember getting a smack on the legs by Miss Reed, for talking in class, but I really liked her and was sad when she died of cancer not long after. Of course there was the infamous Miss Smith, when I look back on those days, I don´t think she meant to be as mean as she seemed, I think she was just a product of an old fashioned type of teaching. She thought she could control us better by fear then kindness. I must admit no one dared to say anything when she was teaching, pity it was maths (my worst subject).

Well after years in the army I have settled down in Denmark and I have a son who is 14 years old. It is interesting to compare my son’s school life to my own and I wonder if he will think about his school in the same way we others think about Cotteridge.

Philip Haynes, Holstebro, Denmark
Used to live at 171 Lifford Lane
June 2003

I attended Cotteridge School from 1957 – 1963, my two sisters and brother were also pupils, my older sister started school during the war years. The head teacher at that time was Miss Howard. My memories of the school are very mixed; I remember a teacher called Miss Self, who was very kind and loving; but there was also a teacher called Miss Smith who used to hit us on the head, a practice that would be very unpopular now.

The memory I have most about that time is school dinners were I would have to sit and eat every single morsel, I would be there all of lunch time looking forlornly at Brussels sprouts congealed with cold gravy, I wasn’t allowed to leave until they had gone, most days I went home with them in my pocket much to my mothers disapproval. I remember playing tig on green (until they painted all the railings blue) and playing with the girls from the secondary school which was closed before I had a chance of going there, I remember the boys were in a different playground to the girls, and we weren’t encouraged to mix. There are such a lot of memories pouring in right now.

From Cotteridge School I went to Queensbridge Secondary School in Moseley, worked for a few years met a great guy, married moved to Somerset and then on to Perth, Western Australia, where I have been living very happily for the last 15 years. I got this site through one of my friends who I was at Cotteridge School with, we still keep in touch.

Eileen Hughes (née Waterhouse)
Perth, Western Australia
July 2001

I left Cotteridge School in 1968. During my time there the headmistress was Miss Howard, who was followed by Mrs. Copeland. The teachers in the Infants were Miss Self, Mrs. Brooking and Mrs. Frederick. the Junior teachers were Miss Meggs, Miss Smith, Mrs. Wells and Mr Hewlitt. He retired in 1967 and the photo shows me presenting him with a present. I was chosen because I was the oldest child in the school.

In 1967 we had a new head, Mr Pebworth and Mr Waugh came to be a junior teacher. The caretakers were Mr and Mrs Dandy. Sports Day was held at GKN sports ground (where Do-It-All is now). Everything we needed for sports day had to be carried down the road from school. So a stream of children carried bins, tables, hoops, skipping ropes, bean bags, dressing up clothes etc. We had running races, skipping, bean bag, dressing up and egg and spoon races. We had swimming lessons at Stirchley baths and we all had to walk there and back.

The annexe building was an art college. In 1967/68 Mr. Pebworth taught some pupils Irish dancing for a display in front of parents. We wore green silk skirts. We also put on a production of “The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe”. At morning breaktime we all had a little bottle of milk. Juniors were milk monitors who took the crates of milk round to each classroom. Fourth year juniors were also duster monitors. On Monday mornings they had to collect clean dusters and towels from the caretakers and deliver them to each classroom and then on Friday afternoon they had to collect them back up for the caretaker to wash them over the weekend ready for Monday. These reports are for my sister Susan and me.

Later on, both my daughters went to Cotteridge School. Elizabeth is at Birmingham University doing Maths and Lyndsey is working in a science laboratory.

Mrs Margaret Dunbar, née Middleham
Cotteridge
September 2000